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Been Missing You


Although some people understandably have mistaken the street scene for New York City or London, the director intentionally looked for a location in downtown Los Angeles where there was "no Stucco" on the walls which would have been a dead giveaway that it was shot in the southwest U. To start the clip, John Waite is sitting in a chair, and after seeing a picture of a woman played by actress Elizabeth Reiko Kubota [9] with whom he is still in love, he, frustrated, slaps the lamp above him causing it to swing back and forth and begins to sing the song.

When he opens his bedroom door, a woman playfully jumps into his arms and they embrace falling back onto the bed. Later, Waite watches through a crack in the door as the woman angrily throws her clothes into her suitcase.

She pushes through the door to leave him and it hits him in the face full force as she storms past him, away. Pained at her emotional and physical assault, he sadly remembers being at one of her photo shoots.

Trying to be cool, Waite leans on a lighting stand but misses and stumbles. Seeing this, she lovingly laughs at his fumbling. Does this resonate for you?

The song is about a broken relationship that isn't over yet for one partner. This song cleverly describes some of them, from the mundane to the unusual, because "I don't care how you get here, just get here if you can.

This song emphasizes hindsight in a broken love relationship, highlighting the man's desire to make things right: Baby come back, any kind of fool could see There was something in everything about you Baby come back, you can blame it all on me I was wrong and I just can't live without you But every time I pause, I still think of you.

She has missed him so badly that it makes you think she is a little crazy herself. The young man offers her long-distance love as well as encouragement to keep hanging in there for two more years until they can be together again. This song was written two years after Clapton's four-year old son, Conor, fell from a window of a 53rd-floor New York apartment building.

In the years since, Clapton dealt with his grief by writing this Grammy-nominated song and by making public service announcements for childproofing windows and staircases.